My Foundry Setup

I have been asked about my Foundry setup and what I did to make everything so smooth, easy, and cool. I decided to not do a video about it because most of the modules I use already do a very fine job explaining themselves and Encounter Library already has an extensive set of tutorial videos.
So, here are the modules I use with a short explanation of what exactly they do.


Automated Julie & Ben’s Animated Assets: Basically, Julie & Ben make animated assets for various uses but setting it up to look cool in game is kind of a hassle. That’s where Automated Animations come in. With almost no configuration, it uses those cool animations when you attack, cast spells or anything else automatically.


The Furnace: Adds a few nice tidbits which, the nicest of, I think is the Split Journal option. You just select a journal entry and then split it based on headlines. This allows you, if you use D&D Beyond, for example, to just copy the entire text of a chapter, go over it to make sure headlines are straight and then, with a click of a button, create individual entries for each room, which you can drag into the map.

And when you do that, use…

Automatic Journal Icon Numbers: Which creates custom journal notes icons based on the title of your entry. So toss away all those custom marker you specifically made.

Example of assorted pins on a map


Bar Brawl: Allows you to use more bars on your token. A lot more. About as much as you want. You can tell the bars to access any data field on the linked character sheet, change colors, set up what data they display, where they’re located, etc.

Bar Brawl


Characters Actions List Compact D&D Beyond Character Sheet: The Actions List is a library of sorts that generates the Actions component similar to the Actions tab in D&D Beyond’s character sheet. This allows the Compact D&D Beyond Character Sheet to modify the presentation of character data to look more like how it does in D&D Beyond. I use this because my players are very familiar with D&D Beyond and this helps them get used to the system.


Chat Images: This is a really cool module. It allows you to drop images in chat, drag them in, paste in, load from URL, and even, that’s the real cool part, click on them to force show them to everyone full screen.

It happens to me a lot that I just want to share a snippet of something to my players and this allows me to bypass difficult uploading or going to another program to send it. It’s all quick and easy.

 


Combat Numbers: This is just a cute little thing that shows computer-game-like damage/healing numbers on tokens when you change their HP.

preview2


Combat Utility Belt: Explaining everything that CUB does will take an article of itself. I mostly use it to reroll initiative every round, for enhanced conditions, and for tracking concentration.


Conditional Visibility: Adds variable sight options for tokens (Such as Blindsight and Tremorsense) and it also adds specialty conditions you can attach to tokens to represent their visibility, up to a point that you can change a token to stealth, it’ll roll the check, and will then compare to other tokens’ passive score and only show it to them if they should see the hidden token.


Crash’s Automatic Blind Rolls: This module allows you to set which skill or ability rolls will automatically roll blind. Want to allow your players to roll their own Insight and Deception but not see the result beyond what you tell them, this is what you need.


D&D Beyond Importer: This is what, for me, is the lynchpin of moving from Roll20 to Foundry. I have all my content on D&D Beyond and getting it on Roll20 is a chore. But with this, a few clicks, and a few minutes, and all my DDB character and monster content is in Foundry.

bulk-spell-import


DF Curvy Walls: Drawing walls in Foundry is about as much of a hassle as anywhere else. It takes work. Curvy Walls makes all that easier. First of all, it allows you to draw curves with ease.

Curvy Walls Banner

And it even makes drawing simple rectangles quick and easy.

df-curvy-walls-rectangle


DF Settings Clarity: Basic Foundry QoL mod. Mostly because it allows you to search the module settings which is, when you get to as many as mine, quite useful.


Drag Ruler: Changes the regular movement method into just dragging and dropping and also adds a colored measurement, based on the character’s speed, that tells you how far you can go.


Terrain Layer & Terrain Ruler: Terrain Layer allows you to mark certain areas on the map to be difficult terrain and Terrain Ruler interfaces that and Drag Ruler to take that into account when you measure your movement.

A ruler measuring distance including difficult terrain


Dynamic Active Effects: This is another one of the big modules that make moving to Foundry worth while and as such, it is a bit complicated. What it does is add another parallel system of effects on items and characters. And you can create effects to modify AC, damage, movement, and pretty much any detail in the game. You want Mage Armor? Add an effect that overrides AC to be 13 + Dex. Want Rage? Add an effect that adds damage to all melee damage and adds advantage to all strength check. Then you can turn those on and off however you want.

And then, you add…

Active Auras: that allows you to have actual dynamic auras that transfer bonuses to other characters. For example, you can set up your Paladin with an aura that will dynamically give a bonus to saves to any token close enough.

ActiveAuras test2


Forien’s Quest Log: This is a cool little addition that adds a quest log to Foundry. You can manage which quests the party is following, who’s it for, who gave it to them, what are the objectives and what are the rewards. Also, you can keep GM notes.

Screenshot 2021-04-10 153316


Foundry Community Tables: This is just a compendium chuck-full of all kinds of random tables. If you can think of a random table, it’s probably in there. Check here before you roll your own.


FX Master: Adds various world special effects so that you can have rain and fog or scanlines.


Give Item to Another Player: Adds another button next to each item in the inventory, allowing players to give items to other players without the hassle.


GM Screen: Allows you to set up a pull up a screen of quick reference data, basically, a grid of journal entries you can see with a click

Demonstration of the GM Screen Grid with dnd5e content.


Hide GM Rolls: Just hides the underlying formula for GM rolls from players, when you want to roll in the open but not tell your players the NPC’s exact bonuses.


Layer Hotkeys: Allows you to switch between different layer with set hotkeys. It should allow you to also change the sub-tools under the layers but it’s not working for me.


Magic Items: Specific for D&D, this adds the Magic Item tab to each item, allowing you to attach spells and feats to item.


Midi-QoL: A lot of quality of life improvements that mostly make rolling for various things faster and easier.


Minimap: Gives guides and players another tool that shows a miniature version of the total map that you’re on. Very useful for players to plan.

Screenshot 2021-04-09 082050


Narrator Tools: Gives a couple of narrative tools to give your game some more feel. Marked differently in chat and on the screen itself, the text stands out. And you can even quick narrate from Journal Entries.

img


Parallaxia: Allows you to draw tiles that move.


Pointer and Pings: Gives you a simple but cool pinging tool.

pnp


Polyglot: Adds the ability to enter chat messages with different languages so only those who know them can read. Mostly useful for text games or books and scrolls that players find. Gets somewhat uncomfortable as a substitute for speech.

Guide's View

Guide’s View
Player's View

Player’s View


Quick Combat: Gives a few improvements to starting and stopping a combat encounter. It automatically starts a playlist and returns to the previous one, it can autoroll everyone or just NPCs, etc…


Quick Insert: Allows you to quick search and insert any entity to anywhere that accepts it. It is an absolute boon for game setup and character creation.


Quick Select Status: When you have a lot of possible conditions to set on actors (like I like it), you need this to make sense of everything. It makes the conditions list searchable so you spend less time looking for that specific condition by icon.


Shared Compendiums: Not really a module of itself but a set of instructions of how to create a module you can use to share compendiums between worlds. Very useful if you’re running multiple games and don’t want to create something more than once.


Simple Calendar: Adds a calendar to your game where you can write notes and track the game days. And it’s also configurable to several known fantasy calendars.Screenshot 2021-04-09 095139


Simple Dice Roller: In case you just want to roll some dice, this adds another tool that opens a quick rolling window.

Screenshot 2021-04-09 095313


Skill Customisation: Modifies the regular skills list in D&D 5E to allow you to change the ability, and add flat or formula bonuses.

Screenshot 2021-04-09 132545

Regular

Untitled

Customised


Smart Doors: Makes doors much more manageable by making them more visible, toggling between states, getting alerts and even synchronising door states.


Stairways: Are triggered teleporters you can use to connect different sections of the map by animation or by jump and you can even use them to connect different scenes so that your players can move between floors on their own.


Thandul’s Togglable Effects: Just a list of quick shortcuts for effects common in D&D. Just open the menu and select the effects. No need to enter formulas manually.


Token Action HUD: Basically makes having an open character sheet obsolete. Almost everything you need to use on a constant basis is now in a quick action menu that’s only there when you need it.


Token Attacher: Allows you to attach anything to any token, perfect for attaching that concentration spell’s template to the character that maintains it.


Token Auras: Moved from Roll20 to Foundry? Upset you don’t have the ability to just set colorful auras around your character? Well, now you can. This does nothing mechanically but if you want to always see the earth elemental’s tremorsense, this is great. No toggle for owner/everyone view, though.


Token HUD Wildcard: A small addition but worth it if you have a lot of token images and like to use Wildcards. Also, it’s the best way I know to represent shapeshifters in the game. This adds a little button to the token HUD that allows you to choose a different image for it.


Token Info Icons: Adds info icons to the Token HUD so you can quickly check things like a character’s Armor Class or Passive Perception. These are very customisable.


Token Magic FX: Adds a bunch of cool effects you can apply to templates to make them look better. Also, a few other modules rely on this.


Token Mold: Allows setting of global overrides for token fields. I mostly use it to randomise the names of NPCs so the players can decide targets specifically while also not have too much information when they see Minotaur 8.


Turn Marker: This just adds a colorful animated marker underneath the token whos turn this is. It’s not entirely necessary but I think it makes it easier to follow combat.

Screenshot 2021-04-10 143349


Wall Height: Adds the ability to set starting and ending height for walls so that flying or climbing PCs can look above them while not showing what’s behind them for characters on the ground.


Map Packs

These are just sources for high quality maps you can get through the Foundry Modules system.
Baileywiki Maps Pack
Dragonfire Maps
Caeora Pack
Moonlight Maps


Posted in Gaming, Role-Playing, Thinking Out Loud by with no comments yet.

קנאה במקום העבודה

אני חושב שמשכורות זה משהו שצריך להיות פומבי במקום העבודה. בדרך כלל, התגובה שאני מקבל היא שזה יגרום לאנשים לקנא. לדעתי, זה דבר טוב. כי רוב האנשים לא חושבים על זה אבל יש שני סוגים של קנאה. השפה העברית פשוט לא מכילה את המילים בשביל זה.

באנגלית, אפשר להבדיל בין Jealousy ל-Envy (למרות שגם דוברי אנגלית לרוב לא יתייחסו להבדל הזה). כשאומרים קנאה, רוב האנשים חושבים על Jealousy. זאת המחשבה שלמישהו לא צריך להיות משהו בגלל שלך אין אותו. זאת מחשבה מאוד שלילית ועוינת ואני מבין למה עדיף להימנע ממנה, במיוחד בין אנשים שאמורים לעבוד ביחד. אבל זאת הגישה הנמוכה והשלילית ואני מעדיף לנקוט בתער של האנלון. Envy היא הרצון גם להשיג משהו שלמישהו אחר יש. ואלא אם כן מדובר במשהו ייחודי (כמו בן זוג של מישהו), רוב הזמן לא מדובר בלקחת לאותו מישהו את מה שיש לו.

איך שאני רואה את זה, אם אני רואה שלמישהו יש משהו מגניב שאני אוהב, אני אחפש איפה אני גם יכול להשיג כזה. אם למישהו באותו תפקיד כמו שלי יש זכויות מסוימות או משכורת טובה יותר ממני, אני אבדוק מה אני יכול לעשות כדי שגם יגיע לי, אני ארצה להשתפר. ומה רע בזה? בכלל, מה רע בלשאול את הבוסים ישירות, “מה אני יכול לעשות כדי שיעריכו אותי יותר? מה המדדים פה? תפוקת קוד גבוהה יותר, יותר יוזמה, הצעות ייעול, הדרכה של חדשים? אני רק רוצה לדעת מה חשוב פה כדי לדעת איפה לרכז מאמצים.”

אז תזכרו להבדיל, קנאה (Jealousy) זה לא דבר טוב אבל קנאה (Envy) זה סבבה אם זה גורם לכם לרצות להשתפר בעצמכם ולא להוריד אנשים אחרים.


Posted in Humanity, Thinking Out Loud by with no comments yet.

How to Make a Unity Package (For the Unity Package Manager)

Let’s say you have a bunch of code you want to drag around with you to every new Unity project, or maybe just the next project you’re doing for the same company. Don’t just copy and paste the same directory over and over again forcing you to also copy changes and updates. Create a package instead!

Unity has switched over to a package model for a lot of the engine’s capabilities. And it also allows you to import non-Asset Store packages straight from GitHub or even locally. So how do you take what you have and make it an easily distributable package? Follow these steps.

  1. In your Project window, below all your regular files is a Packages folder. Right click on it and select Show in Explorer.
  2. In that Packages folder, create a new directory and name it however you like. This will be the root of your package.
    1. Do remember that the folder name can not contain spaces.
  3. Create a new “package.json” file.
    1. This page right here explains everything about the structure of the file.
    2. And here is an example file.
  4. Back in Unity, your new package should be visible with the name you gave it.
  5. Clicking on package file will open it in the Editor UI, allowing you to edit it more conveniently so you don’t have to go back to the JSON.
  6. In that Inspector window, you can also easily add Dependencies if your package requires it which is a much easier workflow than typing them out.
  7. After this basic set up, you’ll want to add your content, this link here will show you the folder and file structure required of a package.
    1. You need the package.json file.
    2. Adding a “README.md”, “CHANGELOG.md”, and “LICENSE.md” files is general practice and provides a better user experience.
    3. The “Editor” folder should contain your editor scripts.
    4. The “Runtime” folder should contain your runtime scripts.
    5. And you can add additional “Tests” and “Documentation~” under their respective folders.
      1. Under “Tests” you do have to add “Editor” and/or “Runtime” sub-folders depending on what you’re testing.
    6. You may also add additional folders and files as you wish.
  8. Just drop your scripts, assets, and whatever else you want from your current project into the correct folder in the package (Regular scripts into “Runtime”, editor scripts into “Editor”, and test scripts into “Tests”).
  9. Then, for every folder you have files in, right click it and select “Create\Assembly Definition”.
    1. It is recommended to name them in reverse web notation in a way that is easy to understand.
    2. For tests, you need to add a reference to your relevant assembly definition file (The runtime file for runtime tests and editor file for editor tests) and to the Unity TestRunner assemblies (Yes, both).
      1. Also, make sure that Editor is the only platform selected.
  10. That’s it, your done defining.
  11. If you move the package anywhere else for safe keeping, you can add it from the Package Manager by pressing the ‘+’ sign, selecting “Add from Disk” and finding your package.json file.
  12. But it is recommended that you upload the contents of your package (Not the folder itself but everything in it) to some Git repository and then you can always add it from Git and your users will be much happier for a constantly updated package.

Posted in Practice, Programming, Thinking Out Loud by with no comments yet.

Blegh.

I apologise to anyone who was expecting something from me recently. I’m feeling sick and this might take a while.


Posted in Life by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 16: Mountain

Blog Archives - Examining LifeEveryone has their mountain. You don’t find it. It’s not there to begin with. You have to build it.

Some people like their mountains small, easy to build, easy to climb. They top it off in some short time and feel satisfied with themselves.

But, as they say, it’s the darers and the dreamers who look at the blueprints for all the tiny mountains and then look away. They dig and scramble and find the parts and the scraps. They design their own mountain. They build it from trash, from non-existence, and from hope. They make it tower over the others and change the skyline.

When other people see that mountain rise up on the landscape, they ooh and ahh. Some cheer, some deride. But they are all intrigued. Will this one succeed? Is this one even climbable? Who is that person that built this mountain? How will the climb be? Who will they be if and when they reach the top? Who will we all be?

Not all of them reach the top. Usually just a scant few do. But, when they do, they change everything.


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 15: Desert

I grew up in a desert. I lived in a desert all my life.

Sometimes people came to my desert, mostly to throw sand at me, or show me how cool trees are and that I couldn’t have any.

I tried to stay inside my desert, keep away from the edges.

A desert isn’t the most comfortable place. I know that. But it’s what I’m familiar with. The outside is more scary.

A desert is vast. It’s very hard to see outside of it, when you’re standing in the middle.

The sand gets everywhere. It makes everything heavy and coarse and annoying. But if you live in the desert, you stay in the desert. Even though it’s hard, it can be harder to get out.

In 2020, a lot more people found their way into their own private desert.

I didn’t choose my desert. It found me. But now I’m working my way out. And it’s ok to ask for help.


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 14: City

Cities are not concrete and steel. Cities are not stone and wood.

Describing a city like that is like describing juice with the design of the bottle that contains it.

Planes can fall on it. Busses could explode in it. Buildings could be razed and neighbourhood could be displaced.

But the city remains if the people do.

It’s when the populous turns on each other, devalues each other, and demonizes each other, that the city falls.

Unfortunately (or fortunately), the same can be said of any sub-part of civilisation.


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 13: New

I’m a scientist. Just so you know where I was starting from. I’m also a little bit anxious. And, by ‘a little bit’, I mean a lot. But it’s not that strange for a bride to be anxious leading up to her wedding day, right? Yes, what I did about it might be construed as strange.

You know how a bride is supposed to have ‘something old, something new, something burrowed, and something blue’ for luck. Well, I wanted to be as lucky as I could be. So, I went to my friends for help.

Jackie is a sociologist. She studies society’s relationship with things. I knew she was my first stop. I explained my situation to her and she gave me a simple pink handkerchief with stitched flowers. Why a handkerchief? It was involved in a longitudinal study of lending and burrowing. She said it was the item that travelled the most. I asked how much. She pulled up one of her datasheets to make sure and said, ‘16,522 times’.

Next, I went to Stuart. He’s a material scientist and an amateur artist. I enquired as to the bluest thing he has. He said he’ll get back to me. He called me about a week later and said he experimented with sapphire dust, lapis lazuli, cordierite, kyanite, and azurite and managed to produce an artificial gem he now calls Deepest Blue and that I’m welcome to the first prototype.

My friend Jen is an archeological anthropologist. She also works for her uni’s museum. I didn’t know anyone from the geology department so I went to her. She knew what I wanted before I even opened my mouth. She said she could get in a lot of trouble. I promised I’ll give it right back after the ceremony and keep it in whatever way she said. It took me promising her a favor from my field before she relented and gave me a Denisovan finger bone. I asked how much. She said about 250 thousand years, give or take 10 or 15 thousand.

I was in charge of the ‘Something New’ Department. You see, I’m a high-energy practical physicist. I experiment with various particles travelling at near lightspeed. And we’ve finally got enough theory together to try and make our own artificial wormhole. And the fun thing about wormholes is that they allow you to create a close time-like curve, the only known way to actually time-travel without breaking causality. Of course, they are not very stable and you are limited in what you can transfer. We fired that baby up three days before the wedding and it was stable for 0.78 milliseconds. But, that was enough to get a short radio burst. When we deciphered it, this is what we got, this little, low-res image of you, twelve weeks along, not even born yet, a picture that was not taken yet and won’t be taken for another three months. Of course, I had to make sure to do the experiment again at that time and send the image back otherwise the universe might have blown up or something, no biggy.

And that’s the story of how I won marriage.


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 12: Old

Why are you interviewing me? Why are you watching this video? Do you really think this is interesting? Yes, I was the first person in the world to get the life extension treatment. But I have no great survival tips for you. It’s all science.

Explain it? Do you really think I know exactly how it works. Something about termite division limitation and resetting. What? Tel-o-meres? Exactly. I’m not a bio-geneticist or whatever they’re called. I was guinea pig. I still am a guinea pig. Those are the conditions.

1029 years old. Yes. I’m not even the oldest. I was young when I got the first dose. After me, older people got it. I’m just the longest running test. I guess that counts for something.

I come for a check up every year. They track my every move. See that flashing red light in my ankle, just under the skin. That’s how. Anyway, they check up on me, make sure everything is running smoothly, and every 20-30 years give me another dose.

How was I selected? Well, I volunteered. It was either this or a shorter life in prison. That ankle monitor is part of the terms of my parole. Yes, there are other parts. But you want your viewers to come back for another one, don’t you?


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.

Flash Fiction February 11: Music

Music is just a pleasant sounding noise. Noise is just a disturbance in a medium — in most cases, air. Well, if you consider space itself as the medium, then all objects produce disturbances in that medium. All stellar objects produce music.

All you need to do is map the fabric of space in the local sector, map the gravity fields of all stellar objects, measure their movements and gravitic interactions over time and there you go, you have music.

Now, the question is, what kind of music? Well, it depends on you frame it, which scale you use, how you transform your telemetry, how much distortion you add. But I found that this arrangement works best: Classic, single G star systems are gentle Baroque. Multi-star system sound more like Beethoven. Pulsars sound like techno-funk. Magnetars are speed metal. Neutron stars sound like Aphex Twin no matter what you do with it.

And colliding black holes work best as Norwegian Death Metal.


Posted in From the Writing Desk, Life, Stories by with no comments yet.